Posted in Fashion History, Film, Historical Hair and Make-up, Vintage

Vintage Fashion Movie Icons – Part 2 – Bonnie and Clyde by Carolyn Hair

Welcoming back guest blogger Carolyn Hair with Part 2 of her Vintage Fashion Movie Icons series.  This time she advises on how to recreate Faye Dunaway’s fashion look from the film Bonnie and Clyde (1967).

FAYE DUNAWAY IN BONNIE AND CLYDE – HOW TO GET THE LOOK

By Carolyn Hair  

Bonnie and Clyde DVD cover from 1967 film. Warren Beatty (Clyde) and Faye Dunaway (Bonnie)

Bonnie’s vintage fashion looks to steal

The best compliment I ever had was being told that I look like Faye Dunaway playing outlaw Bonnie Parker. Well, I was wearing a copycat tan beret over a blonde bob with a dash of black eyeliner at the time. Now I’m no Faye Dunaway but I’ll take it anyway as this glamorised character, with her Depression era style mixed with Left Bank chic, is one of my vintage fashion movie icons.

The Bonnie look which is recreated again and again in fashion spreads, sees its most recent incarnation in pop-star, Rihanna’s ‘Bonnie and Clyde’ shoot in UK Vogue. It’s easy to recreate bits of the look to suit your figure without going all outlaw.

Beret: School uniforms and spies aside, I feel berets have moved beyond cliché. If you dare to join me, there are lots to choose from the high street to vintage.

Fitted jumper or cardigan: Along with berets, cardigans got a huge sales boost from this movie. Whilst they can seem twee at first glance, they never really go out of style whatever your shape. Play with colour, style and neckline to suit.  Check out Movie Knits for a Bonnie-inspired jumper: Movie Knits.

Midi-skirt:  All the rage on the catwalk, they can be difficult to wear if you are shorter (like me) but add some heels and it’s a surprisingly flattering look.

Mary-janes: How can you go wrong? High-heeled brogues could be a bang-on-trend alternative.

Silk scarf: Ubiquitous in vintage shops. Rummage to find one to suit.

Slips: The no-underwear part of Faye Dunaway’s look is perhaps not for everyone but it’s easy to pick-up vintage slips which could be worn with midi-skirts or even as a dress under chunky knitwear.

Tea-dress: This versatile dress is very big at the moment, so you can pick up a high street reproduction or an original in girly floral print or more muted tones.

Jewellery: Go low-key! I don’t advise the full-on excess of the Goldiggers of 1933 (1933) whom Bonnie impersonates in the mirror using her own necklace as a prop.

Here’s Kate Moss wearing an updated version:

http://mamasarollingstone.com/hot-buy-ben-amun-long-coin-necklace/

and check out this pretty necklace which recycles rifle range remnants:

http://ecosalon.com/lustables-bullet-casing-petal-necklace/

Bags: For bank-robber chic, what about the Gladstone bag or variations on this 1930s classic? Or, although it may not seem practical at first, a large clutch could be good to grab and go.

Trench:  Bonnie wears a checked suit in the movie with a high-waisted belt, which can be updated to the fashion staple that is the trench. It never tires and suits all shapes and budgets. For the more patient amongst you, hunt classic styles and brands in charity and vintage stores.

Just as this movie played with period to create a timeless classic, the best way to wear vintage is to mix styles and period, and new and old.  So have fun with the look – just add attitude!

Try out Faye Dunaway’s outlaw style and let us know how you get on.

About Guest Blogger – Carolyn Hair

  • Carolyn works as an online marketing officer for an environmental charity based in Bristol, UK.
  • She blogs at Culture Darling (www.culturedarling.com) where she writes about vintage and eco fashion, film, photos, books and any other cultural trips that take her fancy.
  • Talk fashion and film with her on Twitter @carolynhair
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